Gillian Wearing

Gillian Wearing’s recent exhibition at the Whitechapel gallery really made us think about the difference between our public personas and  our private lives.

“Wearing’s portraits and mini-dramas reveal a paradox, given the chance to dress up, put on a mask or act out a role, the liberation of anonymity allows us to be more truly ourselves. ”

Mulholland Drive

Mulholland Drive was also a source of inspiration simply because you never know what is real and what isn’t throughout the film, in the same way that we never know whether a person is really who they pretend or be or whether it’s just a persona.

“It is an illusion!”

The red velvet stage curtains are significant, because we as an audience never know what is happening behind them, in the same way that we try to conceal our private from our public lives. They act metaphorically as the veil of normality we wear as we go about our daily lives.

Salomé

The illustrations from Salomé are magnificent and seem to capture the decadent mood of outré. The story of Salomé is also relevant. Salomé is mainly concerned with the seductive play of voyeurism and exhibitionism, exhibition and concealment, and the transgression of visual taboos on the body. Invariably, the transgression of these taboos involves illicit sexual desire.

Paris Between the Wars 

Between 1919 and 1939, Paris experienced a cultural and intellectual boom. The city was ablaze with bright lights and the sound of jazz, and the ideas and fashions born there spread across the world and attracted a host of international artists, writers and performers to come and share the excitement of the period that the French called les années folles –the crazy years.

“Because of the lack of open repression in Paris, the city became a focal point for gay men and lesbians and saw the emergence of a varied social scene catering for unconventional sexual orientations.”

“During the 1930s, the attitude of tolerance and even permissiveness was gradually eroded, however, and records identifying ‘deviants’ were established – giving rise to repressive laws under the Vichy regime.”

“Over the centuries, Paris acquired such a reputation for debauchery – from medieval bawds and enlightenment brothels to licentious novels and Toulouse-Lautrec’s petites femmes de Paris – that in some quarters it came to be regarded as ‘the new Babylon’.”


Decadence in Deutschland 

This controversial article from the Sunday Times Magazine charts the rise and profusion of debauched nightclubs in Berlin.

“Driven by such blatant sexual licentiousness and ubiquitous drug-taking that it would make the denizens of the notoriously decadent Weimar clubs of 1920’s Berlin blush in their velvet coffins.”

“People go to Berghain to lose themselves, to become different people, or perhaps to become themselves, with drugs and sex playing key roles in their attempts at transformation.”

Torture Garden 

Torture garden is a monthly fetish party in London. I went to last months event and thoroughly enjoyed it! It is a place to explore fantasy, sexuality and the boundaries of the body. People are free to do whatever they feel like doing without the worry of repercussions and create a new persona just for the night.

Noun 1. fetish – a form of sexual desire in which gratification depends to an abnormal degree on some object or item of clothing or part of the body.

Maximalism

Amazing candle that I received as a house warming gift.

My Feather Hat

A particularly good find from Portobello market.

Muse: Chloe Sevigny 

Her cool and unconventionally sexy style make her a great source of inspiration.

Silhouette Inspiration

Gucci S/S 12, Valentino S/S 12, Gucci S/S 12

Roberto Cavalli S/S 12

Stella McCartney satin jumpsuit

Make-up ideas 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s